Branding and Packaging: The Chocolates

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Great packaging really does make a difference. I was recently reading an article by Joshua Conran about the importance of packaging for companies and especially for smaller businesses. This is definitely a must for makers and I hope that this new series of posts will help you to conceive packaging that will excite and entice your customers. What better way to get started than to look at some fantastic packaging for chocolates. Some of these designs are for real products, like Mon Choco, and others are concepts. They all have one thing in common though: they’re beautiful and unique. Which one is your favorite? Let me know in my new comment section below.

Speaking of chocolate, if you want to see a great chocolate shop and you are in the Portland area, try The Meadow. There is such an incredible array of chocolates, bitters and salts in this fab shop. It’s a must see.

Choco & Co Chocolate, designed by Isabel de Peque: “Special edition of chocolate bar collection for  a coffee and chocolate company based in Madrid, New York, Paris and London. In this edition, the different kinds of chocolate had to show a typical material used in each city.

What I like about it: Simply brilliant, this packaging shows how well photography can be used to enhance packaging. If you’re looking for a great reservoir of images to use, try Unsplash.

MarblePunch Chocolate, designed by Aoshuang Wang: “Marble Punch handcraft their sublime chocolate bars to deliver a complete sensory experience. Inspired by their creativity, technical and collaborative approach, I developed a brand identity and pack design to visualize their story. The wordmark is a clean, confident contrast to the organic lines and handcrafted nature of the flowing marble pattern. Achieved by swirling ink on water and overlying cartridge paper, the result is a beautifully uncompromising identity. ”

What I like about it: It’s hard not to love the marbling effect on the wrappers of these beautiful bars. What’s great about this look is that marbling isn’t as hard as it looks. See a tutorial here.

Chocolate Bar Packaging, designed by Miji Lee. There isn’t a description for this particular project, but thankfully, you can see Miji’s portfolio of sublime designs on her website.

What I like about it: One word: watercolors. I love watercolor art and it looks wonderful on a chocolate bar. It’s the kind of wrapper that makes you wish you could keep it as art.

Luc & Louna packaging, designed by Amanda Mohlin Stuart: “Identity and packaging created for conceptual luxury chocolate brand Luc & Louna. A selection of chocolate bars was developed and designed to showcase the different flavors, each with a minimal approach leaving the chocolate in focus.”

What I like about it: I appreciate the simplicity and the use of a grid/table as a part of the identity. It’s a very clean design, one that invites compels you to investigate.

Vosges Haut Chocolat, designed by Kajsa Klaesén: “Packaging and rebranding project for the brand Vosges Haut-Chocolat. I was assigned to design a new box for chocolate truffles. My plan was to make a collection of three boxes with different patterns. The patterns are made with only one single shape, which is also a part of the logotype. The shape is a loose interpretation of the Fleur-de-lis. This is a School of Visual Arts project, issued by Louise Fili.”

What I like about it: The use of repeating patterns creates an elegant effect. Looks like these would make great gifts, wouldn’t they? 

Mon Choco Packaging, designed by Futura: “Mon Choco is a chocolate brand based in Ivory Coast. The main characteristic of the brief was that our client’s family had been working with cocoa for generations. She decided to formalize her grandfather’s company putting special attention in highlighting that every ingredient and process of every product will be crafted locally. An unusual characteristic of luxury products over there.

We created an illustration that tells the story about the people of Ivory Coast and the way they harvest the cocoa, respecting the traditions in order to make delicious versions of chocolate. Later, that illustration was used as a texture in all the packaging versions. The rest of the branding solution represents the high quality of the products by giving the sensation of luxury.

For us, it was an honor to be part of the creation of a brand that has such respect for values that we treasure as well: the respect of the land, the handmade work, the high quality ingredients, and the pursuit of perfection through taking care of every little detail.”

What I like about it: The artwork that celebrates the growers in the Ivory Coast is a beautiful way to remember the journey that this particular chocolate has traveled.

Summerbird Chocolate, designed by Homework creative studio: Organic chocolate made by nature’s ingredients only. Summerbird have in short time become recognized as some of the best chocolate in the world. Summerbird makes complexity simple. A selection of chocolate bars was developed and designed to showcase the different flavours, and the designs showcase the taste experience, taste profile and more.

What I like about it: I seriously love this packaging. A simple and contemporary color palette makes this a knockout. Personally, I find the contrast between the outer packaging and the shiny silver inner wrapper perfectly complementing. 

Chocho, designed by Hee Jae Kim: “A chocolate branding project that explores packaging via patterns, type, icons, and color. I created the icons of nuts and fruits based off each flavor. I made a technique of layering icons to create a texture for the wrapper’s pattern. With the bellyband, I created a value gradient that correlates to the percent of cocoa. In terms of building the brand’s awareness, the cards are also stickers for the consumer to distribute.”

What I like about it: This is another example of great packaging design that isn’t too hard to create and can be done at low cost. Did you know that band around the bars are called ‘bellybands’? You do now!

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